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SOLD: 1800X & Gigabyte AX370 MB - $461 brand new!
#11
(10-06-2017, 01:28 AM)SickBeast Wrote: Indeed, thanks. :D

Guys it looks like I just bought a Ryzen 1800X CPU! Fun times! I will keep you guys updated. More mining hash rate for me. I do batch image processing also, it's going to fly on this cpu.

Thanks again apoppin. :)

Thank-you, Sick Beast.

I think we both made out OK - I know you got a good deal on a very good workstation platform that also games well. I don't need this platform (now that CL is out), and I can use the money from the sale to buy other HW that will be really useful to BTR.
Cool
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#12
Ryzen actually looks like a pretty decent gaming CPU with the memory running at 2933mhz or higher. I may lose a tiny bit of performance in a few games here and there, however overall I feel this platform will be a lot more future proof for me and it will give me a ton of multithreaded performance. Should I run some before and after benchmarks comparing my current CPU to Ryzen? I'm thinking GTA 5 would be a good test. Maybe Tomb Raider also.

The one thing I'm really going to miss is the Intel RST caching feature. I'm going to have to purchase PrimoCache, and it's not as nice. I will install the trial for it and see how I like it on Ryzen. It gave me a hard time on my current platform, but I don't think my RAM is 100% stable with all 4 dimm slots populated.

I actually think I'm going to sell my current Haswell setup locally. It's not really useful for mining. It only has 3 PCI-E slots and the top two slots are sandwiched together. I'm going to get the same mining board that my brother in law has if and when I go that route. It's only $150CAD for the motherboard and CPU combo, and it has 6 PCI-E slots.

My other concern is that I'm not sure both of my GPUs will fit in my current case with the new motherboard. The bottom card will sit lower in my case now and it may interfere with the hard drive cage. I might have to figure something out, or else get a bigger case. We will see. For the time being I'm just going to run one PC. If and when I can get some kind of GPU deal I might upgrade. I just can't afford to do this all at once. I'm thinking by Black Friday I might be able to assemble a second PC.

Hopefully the CPU mining will continue to be viable. It's hard to believe that this CPU generates almost as much revenue as a single GTX 1070 for mining. I just don't think it will last more than six months.
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#13
(10-06-2017, 03:44 PM)SickBeast Wrote: Ryzen actually looks like a pretty decent gaming CPU with the memory running at 2933mhz or higher.  I may lose a tiny bit of performance in a few games here and there, however overall I feel this platform will be a lot more future proof for me and it will give me a ton of multithreaded performance.  Should I run some before and after benchmarks comparing my current CPU to Ryzen?  I'm thinking GTA 5 would be a good test.  Maybe Tomb Raider also.

The one thing I'm really going to miss is the Intel RST caching feature.  I'm going to have to purchase PrimoCache, and it's not as nice.  I will install the trial for it and see how I like it on Ryzen.  It gave me a hard time on my current platform, but I don't think my RAM is 100% stable with all 4 dimm slots populated.

I actually think I'm going to sell my current Haswell setup locally.  It's not really useful for mining.  It only has 3 PCI-E slots and the top two slots are sandwiched together.  I'm going to get the same mining board that my brother in law has if and when I go that route.  It's only $150CAD for the motherboard and CPU combo, and it has 6 PCI-E slots.

My other concern is that I'm not sure both of my GPUs will fit in my current case with the new motherboard.  The bottom card will sit lower in my case now and it may interfere with the hard drive cage.  I might have to figure something out, or else get a bigger case.  We will see.  For the time being I'm just going to run one PC.  If and when I can get some kind of GPU deal I might upgrade.  I just can't afford to do this all at once.  I'm thinking by Black Friday I might be able to assemble a second PC.

Hopefully the CPU mining will continue to be viable.  It's hard to believe that this CPU generates almost as much revenue as a single GTX 1070 for mining.  I just don't think it will last more than six months.
I agree with you as I had originally planned to build a Ryzen 7 system around 1800X until Coffee Lake released. However, as I need the top gaming platform, I am just going to cut any losses and carry on with Intel's CPU platform.

Yes please, to benchmarks!! Any game that uses the CPU heavily would be a good test including GTA V.
:yes:

Curious. Why do you need a second PC?
Huh
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#14
(10-06-2017, 03:49 PM)apoppin Wrote:
(10-06-2017, 03:44 PM)SickBeast Wrote: Ryzen actually looks like a pretty decent gaming CPU with the memory running at 2933mhz or higher.  I may lose a tiny bit of performance in a few games here and there, however overall I feel this platform will be a lot more future proof for me and it will give me a ton of multithreaded performance.  Should I run some before and after benchmarks comparing my current CPU to Ryzen?  I'm thinking GTA 5 would be a good test.  Maybe Tomb Raider also.

The one thing I'm really going to miss is the Intel RST caching feature.  I'm going to have to purchase PrimoCache, and it's not as nice.  I will install the trial for it and see how I like it on Ryzen.  It gave me a hard time on my current platform, but I don't think my RAM is 100% stable with all 4 dimm slots populated.

I actually think I'm going to sell my current Haswell setup locally.  It's not really useful for mining.  It only has 3 PCI-E slots and the top two slots are sandwiched together.  I'm going to get the same mining board that my brother in law has if and when I go that route.  It's only $150CAD for the motherboard and CPU combo, and it has 6 PCI-E slots.

My other concern is that I'm not sure both of my GPUs will fit in my current case with the new motherboard.  The bottom card will sit lower in my case now and it may interfere with the hard drive cage.  I might have to figure something out, or else get a bigger case.  We will see.  For the time being I'm just going to run one PC.  If and when I can get some kind of GPU deal I might upgrade.  I just can't afford to do this all at once.  I'm thinking by Black Friday I might be able to assemble a second PC.

Hopefully the CPU mining will continue to be viable.  It's hard to believe that this CPU generates almost as much revenue as a single GTX 1070 for mining.  I just don't think it will last more than six months.
I agree with you as I had originally planned to build a Ryzen 7 system around 1800X until Coffee Lake released.  However, as I need the top gaming platform, I am just going to cut any losses and carry on with Intel's CPU platform.

Yes please, to benchmarks!!  Any game that uses the CPU heavily would be a good test including GTA V.
:yes:

Curious.  Why do you need a second PC?
Huh
More mining power. I want to set up a second PC with six GPUs, eventually. I can just add more as time goes on. I will start by dropping my current two GTX 1070 cards into it, and then use a single GTX 1080 Ti or something for my main PC.

I will try to run some benchmarks over the weekend. In fact I'm pretty sure I have a bunch of benchmarks logged from previous testing.
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#15
That makes sense. I guess you are committed to mining. I hope it works out for you.

And I am very interested to see your benchmarks comparing Ryzen 7.
:yes:
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#16
Thanks.  I am hoping I can get one of my H60 coolers to work with it.  Apparently they are compatible without any type of adapter or new bracket which is nice, it saves me $100 on a cooler.  I just hope an H60 can handle that much heat.  I'm not going to overclock.  If I do anything I might try undervolting a bit, but I don't know if I will bother.  What's interesting is that a Ryzen 1700 has significantly less power consumption (close to 50w less) than an 1800X.  So I might play around a bit to find the optimal performance per watt.  Mind you I think my games will need as much frequency as I can get.  If the H60 can handle a 4ghz overclock I might do it.  I'm going to run it at stock speed for at least the first month though to make sure everything is stable.  I built a Ryzen PC for my brother in law and I really liked it.  It was just as responsive as my current Intel build for basic tasks like web browsing.  It looks like the 1800X will at least triple my current multithreaded performance which is great, I don't think I will need an upgrade for a long time.  I certainly won't need more cores in the foreseeable future.  Coffee Lake looks nice but once you overclock it they run extremely hot and the power consumption goes out the window.  It will work great with your massive 280mm cooler.  It's definitely the better gaming CPU, by far.  However for 4k gaming Ryzen looks to be more than good enough.  I might notice a difference in a small handful of games.  However I will gain some performance in other games so it's a bit of a wash.  My i5 4690k isn't exactly a processing beast by today's standards.

JayZ2Cents likes Ryzen for gaming:

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#17
(10-06-2017, 07:54 PM)SickBeast Wrote: Thanks.  I am hoping I can get one of my H60 coolers to work with it.  Apparently they are compatible without any type of adapter or new bracket which is nice, it saves me $100 on a cooler.  I just hope an H60 can handle that much heat.  I'm not going to overclock.  If I do anything I might try undervolting a bit, but I don't know if I will bother.  What's interesting is that a Ryzen 1700 has significantly less power consumption (close to 50w less) than an 1800X.  So I might play around a bit to find the optimal performance per watt.  Mind you I think my games will need as much frequency as I can get.  If the H60 can handle a 4ghz overclock I might do it.  I'm going to run it at stock speed for at least the first month though to make sure everything is stable.  I built a Ryzen PC for my brother in law and I really liked it.  It was just as responsive as my current Intel build for basic tasks like web browsing.  It looks like the 1800X will at least triple my current multithreaded performance which is great, I don't think I will need an upgrade for a long time.  I certainly won't need more cores in the foreseeable future.  Coffee Lake looks nice but once you overclock it they run extremely hot and the power consumption goes out the window.  It will work great with your massive 280mm cooler.  It's definitely the better gaming CPU, by far.  However for 4k gaming Ryzen looks to be more than good enough.  I might notice a difference in a small handful of games.  However I will gain some performance in other games so it's a bit of a wash.  My i5 4690k isn't exactly a processing beast by today's standards.

JayZ2Cents likes Ryzen for gaming:
First of all, Ryzen 7 1800X is fine for 4K gaming - you won't miss Intel one bit. At 1920x1080, it's a different matter.

Secondly, Ryzen 7 1800X is pretty efficient for gaming and I believe it uses less power than an i7-7700K. You may not get 4.0GHz on all 4 cores with any cooler; I believe it is the luck of the draw.
- Good Luck!
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#18
(10-06-2017, 08:46 PM)apoppin Wrote:
(10-06-2017, 07:54 PM)SickBeast Wrote: Thanks.  I am hoping I can get one of my H60 coolers to work with it.  Apparently they are compatible without any type of adapter or new bracket which is nice, it saves me $100 on a cooler.  I just hope an H60 can handle that much heat.  I'm not going to overclock.  If I do anything I might try undervolting a bit, but I don't know if I will bother.  What's interesting is that a Ryzen 1700 has significantly less power consumption (close to 50w less) than an 1800X.  So I might play around a bit to find the optimal performance per watt.  Mind you I think my games will need as much frequency as I can get.  If the H60 can handle a 4ghz overclock I might do it.  I'm going to run it at stock speed for at least the first month though to make sure everything is stable.  I built a Ryzen PC for my brother in law and I really liked it.  It was just as responsive as my current Intel build for basic tasks like web browsing.  It looks like the 1800X will at least triple my current multithreaded performance which is great, I don't think I will need an upgrade for a long time.  I certainly won't need more cores in the foreseeable future.  Coffee Lake looks nice but once you overclock it they run extremely hot and the power consumption goes out the window.  It will work great with your massive 280mm cooler.  It's definitely the better gaming CPU, by far.  However for 4k gaming Ryzen looks to be more than good enough.  I might notice a difference in a small handful of games.  However I will gain some performance in other games so it's a bit of a wash.  My i5 4690k isn't exactly a processing beast by today's standards.

JayZ2Cents likes Ryzen for gaming:
First of all, Ryzen 7 1800X is fine for 4K gaming - you won't miss Intel one bit.  At 1920x1080, it's a different matter.

Secondly, Ryzen 7 1800X is pretty efficient for gaming and I believe it uses less power than an i7-7700K.  You may not get 4.0GHz on all 4 cores with any cooler; I believe it is the luck of the draw.  
- Good Luck!

Thanks.

I do know that in several of my current games, my i5 4690k has been at close to 100% CPU usage across all four cores, even overclocked to 4.5ghz. It will be interesting to monitor my per core CPU usage with Ryzen. I will test GTA 5 and Tomb Raider, both seem to perform better on Intel systems. Maybe Battlefield 1 would be a good test also and Deus Ex. I will see. I don't think those games have built in benchmarks. Actually Ghost Recon Wildlands would be great to test and it has really been taxing my current i5 CPU.
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#19
(10-06-2017, 09:44 PM)SickBeast Wrote: Thanks.

I do know that in several of my current games, my i5 4690k has been at close to 100% CPU usage across all four cores, even overclocked to 4.5ghz.  It will be interesting to monitor my per core CPU usage with Ryzen.  I will test GTA 5 and Tomb Raider, both seem to perform better on Intel systems.  Maybe Battlefield 1 would be a good test also and Deus Ex.  I will see.  I don't think those games have built in benchmarks.  Actually Ghost Recon Wildlands would be great to test and it has really been taxing my current i5 CPU.
You're welcome. The latest Deus Ex has a built in DX12 benchmark and it's a good one. So are the games you mentioned. BF1 is easy to bench with Fraps in DX11 - use the tank sequence from the SP campaign. It's a pretty straightforward path. Metro LL is still an golden oldie as is Crysis 3. Do you have DiRT: Rally? But I think it is more of a GPU-heavy benchmark (like Wildlands is).

I am still working trying to post 3 evaluations by Tuesday.

I haven't found a suitable box shipping box yet. If worst comes to worst, you will be getting your HW in a Vega 64 LC box.
Blush



I just read this - good news for cooling Ryzen 7 and not so good news for me cooling 8700K
(I also posted this in the CL thread)

http://techreport.com/blog/32661/just-ho...offee-lake

Quote: . . . at the end of the day, Coffee Lake does seem to run hotter at stock speeds than the quad-core CPUs that have come before it. That's probably as it should be: there are two more cores and four more threads to deal with under the heat spreader. Builders planning to cool the chip at stock speeds should certainly be able to get away with an inexpensive cooler like a Hyper 212 Evo, but those hoping for a Prime95-stable overclock without a delid and repaste need to budget for a substantial liquid cooler. In that sense, the i7-8700K is no different than the Core i7-6700K and Core i7-7700K before it, and it's definitely harder to cool than AMD's Ryzen CPUs. AMD's chips all boast soldered heat spreaders, and metal is undeniably a better thermal transfer medium than paste.
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#20
I'm really shocked to see Intel release their chips with such a poor thermal design. It's too bad. Hopefully they will fix it with their new chips in the future.
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